scml  Check-in [b839592894]

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Overview
Comment:fix docs AGAIN
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SHA3-256: b83959289404e56840d0057f36b79c97122310c1eef7c1d2062d3e5800d00127
User & Date: lexi 2019-05-25 06:44:23
Context
2019-05-25
06:45
fix docs AGAIN check-in: cf358f5850 user: lexi tags: trunk
06:44
fix docs AGAIN check-in: b839592894 user: lexi tags: trunk
06:43
fix docs check-in: d08ee0edd6 user: lexi tags: trunk
Changes

Changes to README.md.

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this should be fairly straightforward to understand. there are three exceptions, and these both have to do with how scml handles attributes, which have no straightforward s-exp equivalent.

we'll start with the easier one. the form `(- …)` is used to create tags that do not have bodies. the `<meta>` tag is one such tag. attributes and values are supplied after the name of the tag consed together, e.g. `(key . "value")`. for instance, `<input name="user" type="text">` translates to `(- input (name . "user") (type . "text"))`.

> **note:** the Chicken Scheme reader (the function that transforms text into s-expressions),
> along with many other Scheme readers, allows the use of brackets beyond mere parentheses.
> while it is less strictly portable, you can use your choice of brackets to make code more
> readable, perhaps setting off attribute lists with `[ … ]` and code blocks as `{% … } {@ … }`
> `{= …}`, or any other style that works best for you. e.g.:

normal tags can take attributes too; in fact, the `(- …)` form is simply syntactic sugar for the full form. consider the HTML element `<textarea name="desc">description</textarea>` - we can express this in scml as `((textarea (name . "desc")) "description")`. in other words, if the first term of a list is another list, the compiler interprets it as the tag followed by an attribute list.

"boolean" attributes can also be encoded this way. rather than using a cons pair, you can simply enter them into the attribute list as symbols. this enables us to write a `<!doctype html>` declaration using one of two constructs

    ((!doctype html)) ; no semantic sugar







|







37
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this should be fairly straightforward to understand. there are three exceptions, and these both have to do with how scml handles attributes, which have no straightforward s-exp equivalent.

we'll start with the easier one. the form `(- …)` is used to create tags that do not have bodies. the `<meta>` tag is one such tag. attributes and values are supplied after the name of the tag consed together, e.g. `(key . "value")`. for instance, `<input name="user" type="text">` translates to `(- input (name . "user") (type . "text"))`.

> **note:** the Chicken Scheme reader (the function that transforms text into s-expressions),
> along with many other Scheme readers, allows the use of brackets beyond mere parentheses.
> while it is less strictly portable, you can use your choice of brackets to make code more
> readable, perhaps setting off attribute lists with `[ … ]` and code blocks as `{% … }` `{@ … }`
> `{= …}`, or any other style that works best for you. e.g.:

normal tags can take attributes too; in fact, the `(- …)` form is simply syntactic sugar for the full form. consider the HTML element `<textarea name="desc">description</textarea>` - we can express this in scml as `((textarea (name . "desc")) "description")`. in other words, if the first term of a list is another list, the compiler interprets it as the tag followed by an attribute list.

"boolean" attributes can also be encoded this way. rather than using a cons pair, you can simply enter them into the attribute list as symbols. this enables us to write a `<!doctype html>` declaration using one of two constructs

    ((!doctype html)) ; no semantic sugar